10/8/2013

Android adware vulnerabilities are so BAD, researchers won’t ID it

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

A popular mobile ad library used by multiple Android apps poses a severe malware threat, researchers at infosec firm FireEye have warned. The security researchers said that altogether 200 million affected apps had been downloaded.

This ad library aggressively collects sensitive data and is able to perform dangerous operations such as calling home to a command-and-control server before downloading and running secondary components on demand.

Mobile ad libraries are third-party software included by host apps in order to display ads. Because this library could potentially be used to conduct large-scale attacks on millions of users, FireEye refers to it anonymously by the code name “Vulna” rather than revealing its true identity.

An analysis of the most popular apps (those with over one million downloads) on Google Play reveals that 1.8 per cent of them used “Vulna”. The potentially affected apps have been downloaded more than 200 million times in total.

FireEye catalogues a variety of built-in aggressive behaviours which, in addition to vulnerabilities with the technology, make Vulna a threat.

Adobe deals with data breach affecting 2.9m customers

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Adobe has been hit with a massive cyber attack, where hackers obtained customer IDs, passwords and encrypted credit card information of more than 2.9 million customers. Adobe believes the hackers also breached source-code data of several Adobe products, including Acrobat and ColdFusion.

The software giant behind products like Photoshop, InDesign and Shockwave Flash announced last week they had been hit by two separate attacks targeting customer and company information. Adobe is in the process of sending password-reset e-mails and customer security alerts to affected customers to try to mitigate the damage, but there’s a bit of a problem with that approach.

According to independent security reporter Brian Krebs, Adobe has known about the breach since Sept. 17, and they believe the attack happened sometime in mid-August. Considering those customers’ information has been in the hackers’ hands for nearly two months, resetting passwords and canceling credit cards at this point may be moot.

Adobe’s investigation is still in its early stages, and the company hasn’t finished unearthing the full scope of what data may have been compromised.

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