12/10/2005

360 backward-compatibility update released, recalled

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Update withdrawn due to Halo 2 problems, supports Splinter Cell, Ghost Recon, Rainbow Six.

When Microsoft first released the backward-compatibility list for the Xbox 360, many gamers were shocked by some names that weren’t on it. Nowhere to be found were three of the top franchises for the original Xbox: Ghost Recon, Rainbow Six, and Splinter Cell.

Late last night, Microsoft updated the backward-compatibility list with eight games from the trio of Tom Clancy-inspired series. Software emulators for Ghost Recon, Ghost Recon 2, Ghost Recon 2 Summit Strike, Rainbow Six 3, Rainbow Six 3 Black Arrow, Splinter Cell, Splinter Cell Pandora Tomorrow, and Splinter Cell Chaos Theory all became available for download.

However, within hours of the new update’s release, reports began to circulate that it was causing problems with Halo 2. Several GameSpot editors discovered that when they inserted Halo 2 into their 360 consoles, a prompt appeared saying that a software update was needed to play the game.

When contacted by GameSpot, Microsoft reps confirmed the problem and said the new backward-compatibility update has, for the time being, been removed from both Xbox.com and Xbox Live. They also said that a new, Halo 2-compatible version would be available shortly.

Source: gamespot

Wikipedia waddles onto DVD and print in Germany

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

German publishing house Directmedia is taking Wikipedia offline. The German version of the online encyclopedia will be available on a DVD and in print, Heise online reports.

The DVD is available as a free 7.5GB ISO image which you can burn on a DVD. A previous version, which was released in the spring, contained only 2.7GB of data. The new DVD has 200,000-300,000 entries, all in German, and contains more than 100,000 images. The publisher only uses articles from writers who are known to be reliable. However, on the previous DVD were at least a hundred copyrighted articles taken from a DDR Lexika. After the slip-up was discovered, Directmedia immediately replaced the DVD image.

The print version of Wikipedia will be sold for a nominal fee - €9.90 - to cover expenses. The publisher can’t claim copyright. Wikipedia publishes everything under a GNU Free Documentation Licence, the same licence used by developers of open-source software.

Source: The Register

Intel, AMD Believe in the Power of Four

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

The race is on to produce four-core processors for PCs.

Intel Corp., which is readying a bevy of dual-core chips for release in systems in the next month, is already plotting a move to quad cores, which some reports have said could come as soon as early 2007.

Thus the two main PC processor manufacturers, Intel and its rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc., appear to be working toward the same goal of doubling the number of cores their processors can offer customers during 2007.

AMD has already discussed a plan to begin offering a family of four-core chips in 2007, whereas Intel has only hinted about a four- core server chip thus far.

While the chip makers once battled over clock speed—in one form or another—the coming years will bring a new rivalry. where the Intel and AMD will trade barbs on who can offer chips with more processor cores sooner with better performance per watt or how much power each chip consumes versus the amount of performance it offers customers.

Source: eWeek

Former software chief admits stealing trade secrets

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

A former software executive’s guilty plea to charges of breaking into a rival’s computers and stealing trade secrets has offered a rare glimpse into the world of corporate espionage.

John O’Neil, former CEO of Business Engine Software, pleaded guilty in a San Francisco federal court on Wednesday to conspiracy to download and steal the trade secrets of software competitor Niku over a 10-month period.

O’Neil, 43, is the third former executive of the San Francisco company to admit guilt in a case that the FBI’s computer intrusion squad helped to investigate in 2002. He faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in jail and a $250,000 fine. Sentencing is scheduled for next spring.

His plea brings to near conclusion a criminal case that uncovered, in unusual detail, one company’s plunge into the world of corporate espionage in the digital age.

Source: News.com

Court Rules Against Mom in Download Suit

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

A federal appeals court late Friday upheld the music industry’s $22,500 judgment against a Chicago mother caught illegally distributing songs over the Internet.

The court rejected her defense that she was innocently sampling music to find songs she might buy later and compared her downloading and distributing the songs to shoplifting.

The decision against Cecilia Gonzalez, 29, represents one of the earliest appeals court victories by the music industry in copyright lawsuits it has filed against thousands of computer users. The three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago threw out Gonzalez’s arguments that her Internet activities were permitted under U.S. copyright laws.

Gonzalez had rejected a proposed settlement from music companies of about $3,500. A federal judge later filed a summary judgment against her and ordered her to pay $750 for each of 30 songs she was accused of illegally distributing over the Internet.

Source: AP

NBA to create huge digital archive

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

If you’re a rabid basketball fan and have long wished you could get your hands on video of that one memorable shot by Michael Jordan from the Chicago Bulls play-off game you went to in 1989, the National Basketball Association may soon be able to help you out.

The league, working with Silicon Graphics, is setting out to create a digital archive of the entire filmed history of its games, from legendary contests between the Boston Celtics and the Los Angeles Lakers to seemingly meaningless late-season games between out-of-contention teams. The archive will be available at NBA.com. The league unveiled the project Thursday night at SGI’s offices here.

If the project, which could take as long as six years to complete, goes as planned, fans should be able to get their hands on clips of just about any moment they want, and even create their own personalized video reels.

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