3/8/2006

Toshiba unveils laptop with high def DVD and TV

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Japanese technology firm Toshiba on Wednesday unveiled the first high definition laptop computer with a HD DVD optical drive for the new generation of DVD disks and a high resolution display.

The portable computer, introduced at the CeBIT electronics trade fair here, is the latest model under Toshiba’s Qosmio range of high-end audio-video computers.

The computer will retail for a price between 2,500 and 3,500 euros and will be available in all countries within a few weeks, said Oscar Koenders, European computer marketing manager at Toshiba.

The computer is another weapon in the emerging multi-billion dollar battle for the next DVD standard.

Source: Reuters

TDK to withdraw from CD and DVD production

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Japanese disk maker TDK said it would shut down its Luxembourg plant in May and complete its withdrawal from production of CDs and DVDs.

The company’s board decided on Wednesday to close TDK Recording Media Europe with production capacity of seven million CD-Rs and eight million DVD-Rs per month.

“This decision completes TDK’s withdrawal from the manufacturing of recordable CD and DVD products,” TDK said in a statement.

The withdrawal is mainly due to a sharp decline in market prices of recordable CDs and DVDs as well as the increased cost of materials, the company said.

TDK, however, said it would continue selling CDs and DVDs under its own brand by ordering other companies to supply them.

Source: AFP

Intel to have Wi-Max cards this year

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Intel Corp. said on Tuesday it has moved up to this year its expected roll-out of cards that will let computers access the Internet using Wi-Max, a new long-range, high-speed wireless technology.

Wi-Max is seen by many in the field as a successor to Wi-Fi, which provides fast wireless Internet connections in homes and businesses but has a limited range of a few dozen yards.

Wi-Max has a much longer range, varying from a couple of miles in an urban area to 10 miles or more in open country.

Intel, which had previously said it expected to have Wi-Max products in 2007, now plans to have Wi-Max cards for laptops in the second half of this year, Sean Maloney, vice president of Intel’s mobility group, told a company conference.

Intel is also working on a chip that integrates Wi-Max and Wi-Fi, Maloney said.

“Over a period of three years or so, these two technologies essentially will merge,” he said.

Source: Reuters

Another Mac OS X hack challenge launched

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

A university systems engineer in Wisconsin is inviting hackers to break into his Mac.

Dave Schroeder, a senior systems engineer at the University of Wisconsin, launched his contest on Monday. An earlier challenge was too easy, he said.

Schroeder is asking hackers to alter the home page hosted on a Mac mini that is running Mac OS X 10.4.5 with the latest security updates. The system has two local accounts, and has SHH and HTTP open–”a lot more than most Mac OS X machines will ever have open,” Schroeder said on his Web site.

Source: News.com

Microsoft debuts Web-to-PC clipboard

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Microsoft Corp. extended an olive branch to some of its harshest critics on Tuesday by proposing a way for Internet users to “cut and paste” live Web data across different sites, just as they can between computer programs.

Ray Ozzie, Microsoft’s chief technical officer, told a conference of top Web developers here that his company wants to openly license a simple technology for sharing data between Web and computer programs — whether Microsoft-controlled or not.

“Live Clipboard,” as the concept technology is known, would take the widely used clipboard feature common to many computer programs and extend it to the Web, allowing users to share organized data between Web sites or move it into PC programs.

In a slide show demonstration, Ozzie showed how users could simply cut and paste complex structured information from one Web site to another, or move the same data, preserving its formatting, to programs running on Windows desktop computers.

He copied personal contact information out of his computer address book into an online shopping checkout page, filling out the order processing pages in a quick gesture, for example.

Live Clipboard is based on JavaScript and standard data formats widely used by Web developers. “This is not platform specific,” Ozzie said, using industry jargon for operating systems like Microsoft Windows or Apple Mac
OS X software.

Microsoft also plans to freely license the software under the Creative Commons license, requiring only that Microsoft receive attribution for its work and that any improvements to the code are shared with other developers.

Live Clipboard is based on JavaScript and standard data formats widely used by Web developers. “This is not platform specific,” Ozzie said, using industry jargon for operating systems like Microsoft Windows or Apple Mac
OS X software.

Microsoft also plans to freely license the software under the Creative Commons license, requiring only that Microsoft receive attribution for its work and that any improvements to the code are shared with other developers.

You can try a demo here

Source: Reuters

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