10/4/2006

Google and Apple collaborating?

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

A posting in a forum for enthusiasts of Intel-based Macs suggests that Apple Computer and Google are collaborating on technology in secret. A Monday post by a user with the alias “Javester” purports to have uncovered evidence of a Google-Apple technology linkup hidden within iPhoto coding. The posting is fairly technical and includes screenshots.

Source: News.com

Yahoo serving up search ads on mobile phones

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Yahoo on Wednesday launched a beta version of sponsored search results on mobile phones in the United States and United Kingdom.

Like Yahoo’s sponsored search results on the Web, advertisers will bid in an auction on keywords that will display their ads on the search results page. The service will work on most mobile phones and handhelds that have Web browsing capabilities.

Source: News.com

Skype founders turn on net TV service

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Those guys behind Kazaa and Skype have started accepting signups for a peer to peer video streaming service they say will deliver high quality full screen TV across the net.

The Janus Friis and Niklas Zennstrom-backed Venice Project is in internal beta, and should be going to public beta soon. Viewers should be able to watch, well, something before Christmas.

Source: The Register

Skype patches Mac OS X flaw

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Skype has released an update for its Mac software following the discovery of a security vulnerability that created a means to compromise Apple PCs running the popular IP telephony application.

The security bug stems from a format string error in the Skype URI handler. The flaw creates a potential means for hackers to create a maliciously constructed Skype URL which, if followed, might allow them to inject hostile code onto vulnerable systems.

Source: The Register

Vista to take hard stand against piracy

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Microsoft Corp.’s forthcoming Windows Vista will take much harsher steps to curtail piracy than previous versions of its operating system, including crippling the usefulness of computers found to be running unlicensed copies of the new software.

The world’s largest software maker said Wednesday that people running a version of Windows Vista that it believes is pirated will initially be denied access to some of the most anticipated Vista features. That includes Windows Aero, an improved graphics technology.

If a legitimate copy is not bought within 30 days, the system will curtail functionality much further by restricting users to just the Web browser for an hour at a time, said Thomas Lindeman, Microsoft senior product manager.

Under that scenario, a person could use the browser to surf the Web, access documents on the hard drive or log onto Web-based e-mail. But the user would not be able to directly open documents from the computer desktop or run other programs such as Outlook e-mail software, Lindeman said.

Microsoft said it won’t stop a computer running pirated Vista software from working completely, and it will continue to deliver critical security updates.

The company also said it has added more sophisticated technology for monitoring whether a system is pirated. For example, the system will be able to perform some piracy checks internally, without contacting Microsoft, Lindeman said.

Microsoft also is adding ways to more closely monitor for piracy among big corporate users, who tend to buy licenses in bulk.

Source: AP

Google launches literacy project

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Google Inc. unveiled on Wednesday a Web site dedicated to literacy, pulling together its books, video, mapping and blogging services to help teachers and educational organizations share reading resources.

The site was launched at the Frankfurt Book Fair, the world’s largest gathering of publishing executives, in conjunction with the United Nations and a literacy campaign organized by fair officials.

While the service seeks to combine a rich set of resources to combat global illiteracy, it also helps bolster the educational credentials at a company with a market value of around $120 billion.

“Google’s business was born out of a desire to help people find information,” said Nikesh Arora, vice president of Google’s European operations.

“We hope this site will serve as a bridge to even greater communication and access to important information about literacy problems — and solutions,” he added.

The project, at google.com/literacy and google.de/literacy, also serves as a fresh way for Google to expand and differentiate its fledgling video service, which is playing catch-up against popular sites such as YouTube.

Source: Reuters

Fujitsu to recall 287,000 Sony-made batteries

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Japanese electronics maker Fujitsu Ltd. said on Wednesday it would recall 287,000 notebook PC batteries made by Sony Corp.

Fujitsu said last week it would recall Sony-made batteries, which Sony has said can on rare occasions short-circuit, overheat and catch fire. But Fujitsu did not specify then the number of batteries affected.

Source: Reuters

AOL to launch new version of software

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

- AOL on Wednesday plans to launch a new version of its software that lets users access their e-mail, instant messaging, search and media on the same screen.

The new software, dubbed AOL OpenRide, comes after it announced plans this summer to offer most of its services for free in an effort to boost online advertising sales.

It also stopped marketing its Internet dial-up access service, but continues to maintain and charge for it.

OpenRide, which lets users check e-mail from rivals such as Google Inc. and Yahoo Inc. reflects a new approach to courting users.

Although it has made most of its services free, AOL now also aims to have users rely on its software for other functions, such as viewing photos or listening to a music collection stored on the PC using the OpenRide.

Source: Reuters

Sony Shares Fall on Playstation Concerns

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

It has been an annus horribilis for Sony. The Japanese electronics company has been hit with a string of embarrassments that have dented its reputation for quality.

Already reeling from a string of laptop battery recalls, Sony Corp. saw its shares drop nearly 3 percent Tuesday amid fresh worries about the upcoming release of its much-anticipated PlayStation 3 video game console.

Sony has already twice delayed the product’s launch amid intensifying competition from rivals Microsoft and Nintendo.

The PlayStation 3 will hit stores in Japan on Nov. 11 and in the United States on Nov. 17. In Europe, they won’t go on sale until March, four months later than planned.

Investors worried about the product after Macquarie Equities analyst David Gibson wrote in a report that PlayStation 3 units on display at the Tokyo Game Show about 10 days ago operated erratically and had to be repeatedly reset.

Source: AP

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