1/25/2008

Mystery Malware Affecting Linux/Apache Web Servers

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Reports are beginning to surface that some Web servers running Linux and Apache are unwittingly infecting thousands of computers, exploiting vulnerabilities in QuickTime, Yahoo! Messenger, and Windows. One way to tell if your machine is infected is if you’re unable to create a directory name beginning with a numeral.

Since details are still sketchy, the best advice right now is to take proactive steps to secure your servers. ‘We asked the Apache Software Foundation if it had any advice on how to detect the rootkit or cleanse a server when it’s found. According to Mark Cox of the Apache security team, “Whilst details are thin as to how the attackers gained root access to the compromised servers, we currently have no evidence that this is due to an unfixed vulnerability in the Apache HTTP Server.”

We sent a similar query to Red Hat, the largest vendor of Linux, but all its security team could tell us was that “At this point in time we have not had access to any affected machines and therefore cannot give guidance on which tools would reliably detect the rootkit.”

Virus writers charged with copyright violation

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Japan has arrested its first suspected virus writers, but in a strange twist the three suspected creators and distributors of a strain of P2P malware have been charged with copyright violation.

The trio were cuffed by cops in Kyoto on suspicion of involvement in a plot to infect users of the Winny P2P file-sharing network with a Trojan horse that displayed images of popular animé characters while wiping MP3 and movie files. The malware, called Harada is Japanese reports, is reckoned to be related to the Pirlames Trojan horse intercepting by net security firm Sophos in Japan last year.

“It isn’t illegal to write viruses in Japan, so the author of the Trojan horse has been arrested for breaching copyright because he used cartoon graphics without permission in his malware,” explained Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos. “Because this is the first arrest in Japan of a virus writer, it’s likely to generate a lot of attention and there may be calls for cybercrime laws to be made tighter.”

Murdoch says won’t make all of online WSJ free

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

News Corp Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch said on Thursday he would not make all online Wall Street Journal content free.

Dow Jones & Co has begun opening access to some previously paid-for items just weeks after the $5.6 billion buyout by News Corp. But Murdoch told a panel at the World Economic Forum annual meeting that there would still be limits.

“We’re sort of dividing it up. Those things that you can get more or less as a commodity on different sites about finance, that will certainly be free at the Wall Street Journal,” he said.

“The really specialized (material) giving the greatest insights, that will still be a subscription service.”

The new Web strategy marks one of the first tangible signs of how Murdoch is putting his imprint on the Wall Street Journal following the takeover, which triggered concerns in some quarters about the future of the newspaper.

Powered by WordPress