1/26/2008

DRM in latest QuickTime cripples Adobe video editing code

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

The latest version of Apple’s QuickTime media player has video production people venting their spleens after discovering that new digital rights management features have crippled the use editing software from Adobe.

Shortly after updating to QuickTime 7.4, legions of people charged chat groups to report they were unable to access files created with Premier and After Effects, two pricey Adobe programs used for editing video. A product manager for After Effects is suggesting users hold off installing the QuickTime update until Adobe and Apple get things straightened out.

Those After Effects users unfortunate enough to have installed the update get a DRM-related error when trying to access their video files. It reads: “After Effects error: opening movie - you do not have permission to open this file (-54).”

The error is the result of periodic checks QuickTime carries out on video files for piracy violations. Videos created using Adobe products don’t supply the needed headers until the movies are rendered, prompting the overly protective QuickTime to conclude they are contraband that should be barred.

Google combats domain name loophole

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Google Inc. said Friday it would help make it less lucrative to tie up millions of Internet addresses using a loophole and keep those domain names from legitimate individuals and businesses.

Over the next few weeks, Google will start looking for names that are repeatedly registered and dropped within a five-day grace period for full refunds.

Google’s AdSense program would exclude those names so no one can generate advertising revenue from claiming them temporarily, a practice known as domain name tasting - the online equivalent of buying expensive clothes on a charge card only to return them for a full refund after wearing them to a party.

“We believe that this policy will have a positive impact for users and domain purchasers across the Web,” Google spokesman Brandon McCormick said.

The company said it notified participants via e-mail Thursday.

Name tasting exploits a grace period originally designed to rectify legitimate mistakes, such as registrants mistyping the domain name they are about to buy. But with automation and a burgeoning online advertising market, entrepreneurs have generated big bucks exploiting the policy to test hoards of names, keeping just the ones that turn out to generate the most revenue.

The practice ties up millions of domain names at any given time, making it more difficult for legitimate individuals and businesses to get a desirable name.

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