7/7/2008

Meet the UK’s most spammed man

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Receiving a few hundred spam messages a day is bad enough, but spare a thought for an unfortunate Orange user who’s the target of a server-straining 44,000 junk mail missives every 24 hours.

Three of the five most spammed individuals on the books of spam filtering service ClearMyMail.com use Orange as an ISP. The other two received a deluge of unwanted ads through private domains registered with 123-reg/GX Networks.

The most heavily besieged member of the quintet, Colin Wells, a workshop foreman for Stagecoach buses, is sent the equivalent of 16 million spam messages a year.

Dan Field, managing director of ClearMyMail, explained that Wells became the particular target of spammers because he made the mistake of clicking on the unsubscribe links of spam emails when he first started using the account. “That just confirmed that the email address was active allowing spammers to sell on his details to other junk mailers, further increasing the amount of spam he was receiving,

Toyota to add solar panels to Prius hybrid: Nikkei

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Toyota Motor Corp plans to install solar panels on its next-generation Prius hybrid cars, becoming the first major automaker to use solar power for a vehicle, the Nikkei business daily reported on Monday.

The paper said Toyota would equip solar panels on the roof of the high-end version of the Prius when it redesigns the gasoline-electric hybrid car early next year, and the power generated by the system would be used for the air conditioning.

‘Public’ online spaces don’t carry speech, rights

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Rant all you want in a public park. A police officer generally won’t eject you for your remarks alone, however unpopular or provocative.

Say it on the Internet, and you’ll find that free speech and other constitutional rights are anything but guaranteed.

Companies in charge of seemingly public spaces online wipe out content that’s controversial but otherwise legal. Service providers write their own rules for users worldwide and set foreign policy when they cooperate with regimes like China. They serve as prosecutor, judge and jury in handling disputes behind closed doors.

The governmental role that companies play online is taking on greater importance as their services - from online hangouts to virtual repositories of photos and video - become more central to public discourse around the world. It’s a fallout of the Internet’s market-driven growth, but possible remedies, including government regulation, can be worse than the symptoms.

Dutch photographer Maarten Dors met the limits of free speech at Yahoo Inc.’s photo-sharing service, Flickr, when he posted an image of an early-adolescent boy with disheveled hair and a ragged T-shirt, staring blankly with a lit cigarette in his mouth.

Without prior notice, Yahoo deleted the photo on grounds it violated an unwritten ban on depicting children smoking. Dors eventually convinced a Yahoo manager that - far from promoting smoking - the photo had value as a statement on poverty and street life in Romania. Yet another employee deleted it again a few months later.

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