12/23/2009

Amazon’s Kindle has copyright protection hacked

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

An Israeli hacker claims to have broken the copyright protection on Amazon’s Kindle e-reader, reports say.

The hack will allow the ebooks stored on the reader to be transferred as pdf files to any other device.

The hacker, known as Labba, responded to a challenge posted on Israeli hacking forum, hacking.org.

It is the latest in a series of Digital Rights Management hacks, the most famous being the reverse engineering of iTunes.

The Kindle e-book reader has been very successful since it was launched in the US in 2007.

Amazon hopes to have sold a million devices by the end of the year.

It leaves it to individual publishers whether they want to apply DRM but books in its main proprietary format .azw, cannot be transferred to other devices.

It did not immediately respond to the news but it is likely it will attempt to patch its DRM software.

Mom calls cops for help with son’s gaming addiction

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

A 14-year-old boy’s mother had enough with her son’s gaming over the weekend. After turning off the console hoping he would stop gaming, she called police to ask for their help in solving her son’s “addiction.”

Angela Mejia had enough with her son’s gaming when she found him playing Grand Theft Auto at 2:30 a.m. She told him to go to sleep, but he refused.

“Sometimes I want to run away, too,” Mejia told the Boston Herald. “I have support from my church, but I’m alone. I want to help my son, but I can’t find a way.”

After unplugging her son’s game console, she decided to call 911. Police came to Mejia’s home and coaxed the boy into going to sleep.

Court: Microsoft violated patent; can’t sell Word

Filed under: — Aviran

A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld a $290 million judgment against Microsoft Corp. and issued an injunction that will prevent the sale of its popular Word software.

The court injunction is set to go into effect Jan. 11. Microsoft has said such a bar would prohibit the sale of all currently available versions of Microsoft Word and Microsoft Office.

Microsoft had appealed a Texas jury verdict in favor of i4i Inc., a Toronto company. The jury found recent versions of Microsoft Word infringed on a software patent.

Microsoft has said that it and the public will both suffer if Word goes off the market while the company devises a workaround. The court said the decision does not affect copies of the programs sold before the injunction goes into effect, so Microsoft can still provide technical support to the old versions even if they infringe on the patent. .

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