1/8/2010

Acer Recalls 22,000 Notebooks Due to Burn Hazard

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with Acer, today announced a voluntary recall of 22,000 Notebook computers.

Certain Acer Aspire-series Notebook Computers may have an internal microphone wire under the palm rest can short circuit and overheat. This poses a potential burn hazard to consumers.

Acer has received three reports of computers short circuiting, resulting in slight melting of the external casing. No incidents occurred in the United States. No injuries have been reported.

The recalled notebook computer models are the Acer AS3410, AS3410T, AS3810T, AS3810TG, AS3810TZ and AS3810TZG. The computer’s screen size is about 13.3 inches measured diagonally. Not all units are affected. Consumers should contact Acer to determine if their unit is included in the recall.

Sold at: ABS Computer Technologies, D&H Distributing, Fry’s Electronics, Ingram Micro, Radio Shack, SED/American Express, Synnex Corporation, SYX Distribution, Tech Data Corporation and other retailers nationwide and Amazon.com from June 2009 through October 2009 for between $650 and $1,150.

According to the recall instruction, consumers should stop using the recalled notebook computers immediately and contact Acer to determine if their notebook is affected and to receive a free repair.

For additional information, contact Acer toll-free at (866) 695-2237 anytime, or visit the firm’s Web site at www.acer.com

Intel Demonstrates Blu-ray Stereo 3D Demo at CES

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Intel demonstrated a giant leap towards bringing 3D content to the home with Blu-ray Stereo 3D playback on the new 2010 Intel® Core™ i5 Processor with Intel® HD Graphics at the Consumer Electronics Show 2010. The new Blu-ray 3D specification, announced by the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) sets the stage for consumers to view Blu-ray 3D content on their Intel based PCs.

RSA crypto 768-bit keys broken

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

An international team of mathematicians, computer scientists and cryptographers broke the key though NFS, or number field sieve, which allowed them to deduce two prime numbers that when multiplied together generated a number with 768 bits. The discovery, which took about two-and-a-half years and hundreds of general-purpose computers, means 768-bit RSA keys can no longer be counted on to encrypt or authenticate sensitive communications.

More importantly, it means it’s only a matter of another decade or so - sooner assuming there’s some sort of breakthrough in NFS or some other form of mathematical factoring - until the next largest RSA key size, at 1024 bits, is similarly cracked. The accomplishment was reached on December 12.

Intel rolls out new chips that show lead over AMD

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Intel Corp. rolled out new computer chips Thursday that highlight the company’s lead over Advanced Micro Devices Inc. in its ability to shrink the circuitry inside its processors.

Intel’s new Core chips, unveiled at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, are the company’s first to feature tiny parts whose average width is 32 nanometers.

32 nanometers chips will better performance and lower computer prices. Chip makers benefit from the ability to add more features and cut costs.

AMD’s 32-nanometer chips won’t appear in personal computers until 2011. It has argued that circuitry size isn’t as important as performance and graphics.

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