1/27/2010

Google Toolbar caught tracking users when ‘disabled’

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Google has updated its browser toolbar after the application was caught tracking urls even when specifically “disabled” by the user.

In a Monday blog post, Harvard professor and noted Google critic Ben Edelmen provided video evidence of the Google toolbar transmitting data back to the Mountain View Chocolate Factory after he chose to disable the application in the browser window he was currently using.

The Google toolbar offers two disable options: one is meant to disable the toolbar “permanently,” and the other is meant to disable the app “only for this window.”

In a statement passed to The Reg, Google has acknowledged the bug. According to the statement, the bug affects Google Toolbar versions 6.3.911.1819 through 6.4.1311.42 for Internet Explorer. An update that fixes the bug is now available here, and the company intends to automatically update users’ toolbars sometime today.

PlayStation 3 Hack Released Online

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

On Friday, George Hotz, best known for cracking Apple’s iPhone, said he had managed to hack the PlayStation 3 after five weeks of work with ‘very simple hardware cleverly applied, and some not so simple software.’ Days later, he has now released the exploit, saying in a blog post that he wanted to see what others could do with it.

‘Hopefully, this will ignite the PS3 scene, and you will organize and figure out how to use this to do practical things, like the iPhone when jailbreaks were first released,’ he wrote. ‘I have a life to get back to and can’t keep working on this all day and night.

Source: Slashdot

Tracking Browsers Without Cookies Or IP Addresses?

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

The EFF has launched a research project called Panopticlick, to determine whether seemingly innocuous browser configuration information (like User Agent strings, plugin versions and, fonts) may create unique fingerprints that allow web users to be tracked, even if they limit or delete cookies.

Preliminary results indicate that the User Agent string alone has 10.5 bits of entropy, which means that for a typical Internet user, only one in about 1,500 (2 ^ 10.5) others will share their User Agent string.

If you visit Panopticlick, you can get an reading of how rare or unique your browser configuration is, as well as helping EFF to collect better data about this problem and how best to defend against it.

Google releases new Google Voice for iPhone

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Google Inc unveiled a new version of its Internet phone service on Tuesday in its latest effort to bypass Apple Inc’s gatekeepers and make Google Voice a popular service on the iPhone.

The new version of Google Voice can only be accessed through a smartphone’s Web browser, unlike the so-called native apps that can be downloaded directly onto an iPhone.

IFPI Loses “Deep-Linking” Case Against Baidu

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

In 2008, Baidu was sued for around $9 million by Sony BMG, Universal Music and Warner Music for providing so-called “deep-links” to copyright music tracks. A court has now ruled that providing search results does not breach copyright law, clearing China’s biggest search engine of wrong-doing.

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