3/14/2010

Iran arrests 30 over U.S.-linked cyber ring

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Iran has arrested 30 people suspected of belonging to a U.S.-linked cyber network gathering information on Iranian nuclear scientists and sending people abroad for training, a news agency reported on Saturday.

It said the group sought to recruit people through the Internet for training in Iraq with the People’s Mujahideen Organization, a leftist exile group which launched attacks on the Islamic Republic from Saddam Hussein’s Iraq

“Thirty people were arrested in connection with an organized American cyber war network via a series of complex security measures in the field of information technology and communications,” the Fars news agency said.

Google 99.9% sure to shut China search engine

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Talks with China over censorship have reached an apparent impasse and Google, the world’s largest search engine, is now “99.9 percent” certain to shut its Chinese search engine, the Financial Times said on Saturday.

It said in a report on its website Google had drawn up detailed plans for closing its Chinese search engine.

The newspaper cited a person familiar with the company’s thinking as saying that, while a decision could be made very soon, Google was likely to take some time to follow through with its plans.

Google to digitize old books from Rome, Florence

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Google said it will scan up to 1 million old books in national libraries in Rome and Florence, including works by astronomer Galileo Galilei, in what’s being described as the first deal of its kind.

Culture Ministry official Mario Resca says the deal will help save the books’ content forever and noted that the 1966 Florence flood ruined thousands of books in the Tuscan city’s library.

He said digitizing books from before 1868 will help spread Italian culture throughout the world.

Huge ‘botnet’ amputated, but criminals reconnect

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

The sudden takedown of an Internet provider thought to be helping spread one of the most promiscuous pieces of malicious software out there appears to have cut off criminals from potentially millions of personal computers under their control.

But the victory was short-lived. Less than a day after a service known as “AS Troyak” was unplugged from the Internet, security researchers said Wednesday it apparently had found a way to get back online, and criminals were reconnecting with their unmoored machines.

The drama initially raised hopes of a sharp drop-off in fraud, because criminals could no longer communicate with many computers infected with a type of malware known as “ZeuS,” which is mostly used to steal online banking usernames and passwords. Hundreds of criminal operations around the world use the malware.

It’s unknown how many computers are infected with ZeuS, but it’s estimated to be in the millions. Cisco Systems Inc. said as many as 25 percent of the world’s ZeuS-infected machines were unplugged from the massive “botnet” overnight with the takedown of AS Troyak.

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