1/19/2010

D-Link issues fixes for router vulnerabilities

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Router manufacturer D-Link Corp. admitted that some of its routers have a vulnerability that could allow hackers access to a device’s administrative settings. The Taipei, Taiwan-based form said that it has issued patches to fix the flaws.

According to a Jan. 9 blog post from SourceSec Security Research, some D-Link routers have an insecure implementation of the Home Network Administration Protocol (HNAP), which could allow an unauthorized person to change a router’s settings.

D-Link said the models affected are the DIR-855 (version A2), DIR-655 (versions A1 to A4) and DIR-635 (version B). Three discontinued models — DIR-615 (versions B1, B2 and B3), DIR-635 (version A) and DI-634M (version B1) — are also affected.

The company said new firmware updates are being made available across its Web sites.

1/10/2010

Samsung Shows World’s 1st Transparent OLED Laptop

Filed under: — Aviran

Featuring 14-inch OLED display, which when turned off becomes up to 40 percent transparent, the laptop concept is claimed to be the world’s first and largest transparent OLED laptop. This is the only info available at the moment, though you may go through the video for a closer look after the jump.

1/8/2010

Acer Recalls 22,000 Notebooks Due to Burn Hazard

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with Acer, today announced a voluntary recall of 22,000 Notebook computers.

Certain Acer Aspire-series Notebook Computers may have an internal microphone wire under the palm rest can short circuit and overheat. This poses a potential burn hazard to consumers.

Acer has received three reports of computers short circuiting, resulting in slight melting of the external casing. No incidents occurred in the United States. No injuries have been reported.

The recalled notebook computer models are the Acer AS3410, AS3410T, AS3810T, AS3810TG, AS3810TZ and AS3810TZG. The computer’s screen size is about 13.3 inches measured diagonally. Not all units are affected. Consumers should contact Acer to determine if their unit is included in the recall.

Sold at: ABS Computer Technologies, D&H Distributing, Fry’s Electronics, Ingram Micro, Radio Shack, SED/American Express, Synnex Corporation, SYX Distribution, Tech Data Corporation and other retailers nationwide and Amazon.com from June 2009 through October 2009 for between $650 and $1,150.

According to the recall instruction, consumers should stop using the recalled notebook computers immediately and contact Acer to determine if their notebook is affected and to receive a free repair.

For additional information, contact Acer toll-free at (866) 695-2237 anytime, or visit the firm’s Web site at www.acer.com

Intel Demonstrates Blu-ray Stereo 3D Demo at CES

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Intel demonstrated a giant leap towards bringing 3D content to the home with Blu-ray Stereo 3D playback on the new 2010 Intel® Core™ i5 Processor with Intel® HD Graphics at the Consumer Electronics Show 2010. The new Blu-ray 3D specification, announced by the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) sets the stage for consumers to view Blu-ray 3D content on their Intel based PCs.

Intel rolls out new chips that show lead over AMD

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Intel Corp. rolled out new computer chips Thursday that highlight the company’s lead over Advanced Micro Devices Inc. in its ability to shrink the circuitry inside its processors.

Intel’s new Core chips, unveiled at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, are the company’s first to feature tiny parts whose average width is 32 nanometers.

32 nanometers chips will better performance and lower computer prices. Chip makers benefit from the ability to add more features and cut costs.

AMD’s 32-nanometer chips won’t appear in personal computers until 2011. It has argued that circuitry size isn’t as important as performance and graphics.

12/17/2009

Google demos image rec ‘quantum computer’

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Google says it has developed a kind of quantum computer capable of identifying objects that appear in digital photos and videos. According to the company, the system outperforms the classical algorithms running across its current network of worldwide data centers.

Hartmut Neven, Google technical lead manager for image recognition, recently unveiled the company’s ongoing quantum computing work with a post to the company’s research blog, saying he was due to demonstrate the technology at last week’s Neural Information Processing Systems conference in Vancouver.

“Many Google services we offer depend on sophisticated artificial intelligence technologies such as machine learning or pattern recognition,” Neven writes. “If one takes a closer look at such capabilities one realizes that they often require the solution of what mathematicians call hard combinatorial optimization problems. It turns out that solving the hardest of such problems requires server farms so large that they can never be built.

“A new type of machine, a so-called quantum computer, can help here.”

Harmut Neven joined Google in 2006, when the web giant acquired his image search startup, Neven Vision. In 2007, at the SC07 supercomputing conference, Neven joined D-Wave in demonstrating the Canadian company’s alleged quantum computer, and Neven now confirms that Google has spent the past three years working in tandem with D-Wave on a quantum system designed to identify images.

“Google has studied how problems such as recognizing an object in an image or learning to make an optimal decision based on example data can be made amenable to solution by quantum algorithms,” he says. “These algorithms promise to find higher quality solutions for optimization problems than obtainable with classical solvers.”

11/15/2009

Intel settles AMD claims but isn’t off the hook

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Intel Corp. will pay $1.25 billion to make peace with Advanced Micro Devices Inc., as the companies whose microprocessors run nearly all personal computers finally found common ground in a bitter and colorful dispute that caused international antitrust trouble for Intel.

The settlement announced Thursday sent AMD stock soaring and ended a 4-year-old lawsuit in which AMD accused Intel of abusing its dominance of the chip market to keep a lid on AMD’s share. Intel has about 80 percent of the microprocessor market, and AMD has about 20 percent.

According to the lawsuit, Intel penalized computer makers for using AMD’s chips or offered them financial incentives - payments that a Toshiba Corp. manager likened to “cocaine.” Executives from Gateway complained that Intel’s threats of retaliation for working with AMD beat them “into guacamole.”

11/2/2009

Sony Recalls 69,000 Vaio AC Power Adapters

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Sony will recall 69,000 Vaio AC power adapters due to their increased risk of electrical shock, after a handful of reports of short-circuiting units.

“Sony has initiated a voluntary recall for certain AC power adapters which may short circuit and pose a potential electrical shock hazard,” read an Oct. 27 posting on Sony’s eSupport Website.

The recall applies to AC power adapters model VGP-AC19V17 that came with notebook docking stations sold after September 2005 (specifically, the VGP-PRBX1 and VGP-PRFE1 models) and all-in-one computers sold after September 2007 (the VGC-LT, VGC-JS240, VGC-JS250, VGC-JS270, and VGC-JS290 series). In order to see if their power adapter qualifies for the recall, owners can check the serial number at this Sony site.

Sony recommends that users with the affected adapters unplug them immediately.

10/25/2009

Google Envisions 10 Million Servers

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Google never says how many servers are running in its data centers. But a recent presentation by a Google engineer shows that the company is preparing to manage as many as 10 million servers in the future.

Google’s Jeff Dean was one of the keynote speakers at an ACM workshop on large-scale computing systems, and discussed some of the technical details of the company’s mighty infrastructure, which is spread across dozens of data centers around the world.

In his presentation (link via James Hamilton), Dean also discussed a new storage and computation system called Spanner, which will seek to automate management of Google services across multiple data centers. That includes automated allocation of resources across “entire fleets of machines.”

Dean says Spanner will be designed for a future scale of “106 to 107 machines,” meaning 1 million to 10 million machines. The goal will be “automatic, dynamic world-wide placement of data & computation to minimize latency or cost.”

10/23/2009

Acer goes deep with 3-D laptop for gaming, movies

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

Acer Aspire 5738DG-6165 has a 15.6-inch screen that, with the help of special glasses, appears to take on depth if used with the right games or movies.

It’s not the first laptop with a 3-D screen. Sharp Corp. introduced one in 2003. It worked without glasses, but the viewer had to be somewhat careful to keep his head in the right place for the 3-D effect to work. The screen worked similarly to 3-D postcards - the kind with the ribbed plastic layer - but looked more convincing. Like Acer’s model, the 3-D effect could be turned off with a button.

Sharp’s model cost $3,300 and was aimed at engineers and other professionals who might be helped by being able to show objects in 3-D. Acer’s laptop costs just $780, barely more than a comparable, normal laptop.

Windows 7 doesn’t have special features for 3-D screens, so Acer will ship the computer with special movie player software. Finding movies to play on it won’t be easy, however - there’s no real consumer distribution system for the new 3-D movies that are shown in theaters, such as “Monsters vs Aliens.”

10/13/2009

SanDisk ships ‘X4′ flash chips

Filed under: — Aviran Mordo

SanDisk said Monday that it is shipping memory chips that will allow consumers to store more data on tiny Secure Digital flash cards.

The Milpitas, Calif., company’s X4 technology packs four bits of data into each memory cell. To date, flash memory chipmakers typically stored one bit or two bits per cell. Each individual die–or chip–holds 64 gigabits of data, or 8 gigabytes. This is the highest capacity per die in the industry, according to SanDisk.

The technology is shipping now in 8GB and 16GB SDHC (Secure Digital High Capacity) cards as well as 8GB and 16GB Memory Stick PRO Duo cards, the company said.

Future related technology from SanDisk is expected to yield tiny Secure Digital (SD) flash cards that hold 64GB of data and larger capacities. Currently, mainstream SanDisk SD cards top out at 32GB.

The memory technology itself–the 4 bits per cell 64-gigabit memory–is codeveloped and co-owned by SanDisk and Toshiba. The X4 controller technology is solely owned by SanDisk.

10/3/2009

TDK invents 320GB 10 layer Blu-Ray Disc

Filed under: — Aviran

Even though we have yet to see the latest rumored 100GB and 200GB prototype Blu-ray discs, TDK is looking beyond already.

TDK has always pushed the limits. Earlier, TDK are planning 960GB laptop drives and 3.2TB desktop drives. Now, they are ready to demo 320GB ten-layer platters at CEATEC 2009, based on Blu-Ray technology.

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